Church, Be Like Jesus!

Church, I believe there is still hope for our nation.

Okay, call me an optimist, or maybe even delusional, but I truly believe that America can turn around and experience an earth shattering revival that reaches the world.  Why?

Because hope has a name, and His name is Jesus.

As you all know, there have been tons of stories and issues in the past few weeks from the news and social media:

  • ISIS continues to persecute and kill Christians and those who do not adhere to their radical faith and beliefs.
  • The shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • The debate of the Confederate Flag; is it relevant, offensive, and necessary?
  • SCOTUS’s decision to legalize gay marriage in every state in the nation in spite of individual state views.
  • Stories of police brutality.
  • Stories of riots.
  • Instances of racism, whether real, perceived, or made up.
  • Bruce/Caitlyn Jenner
  • The Patriot and Freedom Acts

There have been a lot of contention and heated debates everywhere on social media, resulting in choice words, unfollowing, unfriending, and just flat out name calling.  People are slashing and wounding others within the safety of being behind their screens while the rest of us watch and weep as we attempt to make peace and seek unity.

There are also Christians who insist we are in the end times, that the events of Revelation, 1 Thessalonians, the Gospels, and Daniel are coming to pass.

“The Antichrist is soon coming,” they say, “and it’s (insert person here and reason why).”

“America is becoming like Sodom and Gomorrah.”

“This nation is going to hell in a handbasket!”

“There’s no more hope for America!”

But I believe that there’s hope for this nation, and His name is Jesus.

American Church

Church, we forget (and often!) that Jesus has already won.  Instead, we have a tendency to complain and speculate about the current events and issues in our nation.  We withhold love and grace that Christ and instead Bible bash.  We have these unrealistic expectations for nonbelievers and even fellow Christians to be holy as we, not Christ, are holy.  We get all uppity and hurt because sinners are acting like sinners; it’s in their nature.  In our pride, we tell God that we can do His job better than He can.

We mercilessly and remorselessly limit and manipulate the power of God to make it only “effective” through our “spiritual checklists.”  We make others put on a show to please God as we do the same thing.  Our testimony becomes irrelevant as our works and deeds seem to show a Christian life, but our spiritual and moral lives are bankrupt. It is a religious circus doomed to fail.

We judge others because they sin differently than we do.  We try to take the speck of sawdust out of other people’s eyes when we have enough planks in our own eyes to build a log cabin.

I’m working this summer at a Christian camp.  Here, we meet kids and staff members who have great relationships with Christ.  But we also have those who come from deep, dark stuff bringing stories of abuse, addiction, insecurity, and love withheld or revoked with them.  The staff and I encounter real questions and legitimate concerns.  Their brokenness breaks my heart, but we get to show them Jesus, the Healer of our hurts, the only One who can put us back together into something new.

All of a sudden, the desire to be right fades away.  Contention and chaos cease.  People are now seen as God sees them, as humans with flaws who have been wounded and are looking for answers and in need of a Savior.  This, Church, is where we can save the day, by bringing them Jesus.

Bible

Take a look with me to Matthew 9:10-13.  Here, Jesus reclines with His disciples as well as tax collectors and sinners:

And as Jesus reclined at table in the house, behold, many tax collectors and sinners came and were reclining with Jesus and His disciples. And when the Pharisees saw this, they said to his disciples, “Why does your teacher eat with tax collectors and sinners?”  But when He heard it, he said, “Those who are well have no need of a physician, but those who are sick. Go and learn what this means, “I desire mercy, and not sacrifice.’  For I came not to call the righteous, but sinners.”

Jesus enjoyed having company with sinners…and we should too!

Would you look at that?  Jesus hangs out with the outcasts, the undesirable, and the lowest of the low.  Tax collectors, prostitutes, and sinners are some of His favorite people.  If Jesus was born and living in this day and age, I think He would be in a homeless shelter, talking with the people there.  He would have coffee and conversation with someone in the sex industry.  I would even say that He would share a meal with corrupt business men.  He would be the one who would hug people at a gay pride parade/festival.

I would go even further to say that you would rarely see Him at church.

Before you dismiss me, let me clarify.  The church in the Greek does NOT mean a building.  The church is a living and breathing organism of a people called out that meet together to build one another up and to fulfill the Great Commission (Matthew 28:18-20).

Jesus often went to dark places to shine His light.  I mean, He cast out demons for crying out loud!  Now that Jesus is not physically on this earth, we as the Church (universal) have a responsibility to go to those dark places and do what Jesus did; love what He loves and to be the light of the world.

I will give you the treasures of darkness and the hoards in secret places, that you may know that it is I, the Lord, the God of Israel, who call you by your name. — Isaiah 45:3

Church, darkness rarely finds its way to the light.  Let’s stop praying for people to come to church and instead be the answer to that prayer by doing something!  Let’s go into those dangerous places and shine our God-given light!  After all, if Christ is for you, who can be against you? (Romans 8:31)

The religious took notice…and asked “Why?”

The Pharisees are interesting people.  They know the Word, they’re zealous, follow the commandments, and are often leaders of their time.  In a way, they’re just like you and me.

They’re also like you and me in the sense of hypocrisy.  Some of Jesus’ harshest words were for the Pharisees and religious officials.  These guys upheld the rules (613 statutes of Mosaic Law) and traditions of men over love, justice, and mercy.  They honor God with their lips, but their hearts were far from Him.  They shut the kingdom of heaven in people’s faces.  They are blind guides leading the blind.  They withhold love and grace from other people and expect them to act according to their standards of holiness.

Want to take a quick test to see if you’re a Pharisee?  Replace the mention of Pharisees with yourself.  Take some time to reflect, pray, and repent.  I’ve been guilty of this as well.

The religious look at those who are living for Christ and ask others, and God, “Why are they doing this?  Don’t they know about this person or that place?  God won’t even go near them!”  They claim to be God’s spokespeople.  Don’t be that person.  Ever.

Brothers, if anyone is caught in any transgression, you who are spiritual should restore him in a spirit of gentleness.  Keep watch on yourself, lest you too be tempted. — Galatians 6:1

Who needs a doctor? The well…or the sick?

It’s interesting how Jesus presents this statement in verse 12.  Obviously, you need a doctor when you’re sick.  If you have the life-threatening sickness of sin, then you need the Great Physician, who is none other than Jesus.  The people Jesus built relationships with were sick:  the demon-possessed, the prostitute, the dishonest, etc.  The Pharisees were sick as well, but with a different and dare I say worse illness.

Self-righteousness.

The Pharisees thought they were the special group that’s going to get all the glory from God when they passed away.  They kept the law and saw themselves as more righteous and holy for keeping the law than the layperson.  They looked down on sinners.  They were prideful and competitive.  They had the whole “holier than thou” mentality.

The similarity between the sinner and the self-righteous is that they are both sinners, sin has made them sick and they need the healing power of the gospel in Jesus Christ.

The difference between the two is that the sinner acknowledges their sin and seeks Christ while the self-righteous deny that anything is wrong with them.

It’s amazing to know how sinners can see the face of God and repent while the self-righteous see the face of God and not even feel remorse.

Truly, I say to you, the tax collectors and the prostitutes go into the kingdom of God before you.  For John came to you in the way of righteousness, and you did not believe him, but the tax collectors and the prostitutes believed him.  And even when you saw it, you did not afterward change your minds and believe him. — Matthew 21:31-32

Mercy, or Sacrifice?

The Pharisees were notorious for stepping over people to accomplish the Law.  In essence, they sinned while trying to get people to not sin.  They tie up unbearable burdens on other people, but are not willing to lift a finger to help them (Matthew 23:4).  They think that God wants sacrifice over mercy and that justify their actions.  In other words, God will grant you mercy if you follow the Law and traditions of man with no help from us.

But Jesus flips it.  Instead of forcing people to conform to our expectations, we should see people as God sees them and have compassion on them.  He gave us love, grace, and mercy in our brokenness and sin; why not do the same thing to others?  It’s God’s job to remake us into His image and set us apart.

So what?

With the nuttiness going on around this nation, we need to stop living our couch-potato, lukewarm, defeatist, fatalistic, and self-righteous “Christianity”:

  • We cry “Injustice!” but do nothing else.
  • We are “slacktivists,” where we throw some of our money at a cause, but do nothing else.
  • We obsess over the end times and wait for Jesus to come back, but do nothing else.
  • We debate over doctrine and theological issues while attempting to shun heretics, but do nothing else.
  • We read the Word of God, but do nothing else.
  • We obsess over getting ready for Christ to return, but do nothing else

As Christians, we are called to be Christ-like in everything we say and do.  When we meet people, they should encounter Jesus who says, “Neither do I condemn you.  Go now, and leave your life of sin” (John 8:11).  We need to get up, repent, and get our hands dirty as we win souls for Christ.  Let’s jump into this harvest.  Let’s venture into the dark places.  Let’s get out of our hypocrisy, get away from our computer and phone screens, and make disciples.

Don’t. Give. Up.

People should hate you because of their hatred for Jesus, not because of you being a jerk.

I don’t know about you, but I want to see this nation have an encounter with Christ and for true revival to break out!  Who’s with me?

Until next time, be hidden in the shadow of His wings,

Jon Pannell

P.S. — Enjoy this song from Casting Crowns. Also, let me know if you have any questions!

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